Clearcut Logging

Singletary Timber Sale $$$

“With timber sales, revenue and recreation can collide”, Heraldnet.com 9-3-2017

“Judge halts timber sale near Wallace Falls State Park”, Heraldnet.com 8-18-2017

Environmental groups sue to prevent logging near Wallace Falls State Park, KING 5 News 5-23-2017Petition Photo

Except as provided in RCW 79.22.060, all land, acquired or designated by the department as state forestland, shall be forever reserved from sale, but the valuable materials thereon may be sold or the land may be leased in the same manner and for the same purposes as is authorized for state lands if the department finds such sale or lease to be in THE BEST INTERESTS OF THE STATE and approves the terms and conditions thereof.
In the event that the department sells logs using the contract harvesting process described in RCW 79.15.500 through 79.15.530, the moneys received subject to this section are the net proceeds from the contract harvesting sale.
[ 2003 c 334 § 220; 2003 c 313 § 7; 2000 c 148 § 2; 1998 c 71 § 2. Prior: 1988 c 128 § 32; 1988 c 70 § 1; 1980 c 154 § 11; 1971 ex.s. c 123 § 4; 1955 c 116 § 1; 1953 c 21 § 1; 1923 c 154 § 7; RRS § 5812-7. Formerly RCW 76.12.120.]

Daniel Chasan, J.D. “A Trust for All the People: Rethinking the Management of Washington’s State Forests”, Seattle University Law Review:

“The state does have a continuing duty to help pay school construction costs. But, even if we view that obligation as a trustee’s solemn fiduciary duty, let us remember that the granted lands are protected by two overlapping trusts. A broad public trust has always existed. Courts have ignored this trust, but they have not extinguished it. The trust is still there, and because it is, the environmental and aesthetic values of the granted lands must be safeguarded for all people, in all generations to come. The state’s obligation to the public trust beneficiaries is EVERY BIT AS STRONG AS its obligation to the public schools.”

“Council OKs making request for Wallace Falls land transfer”, article in HeraldNet 3-28-2017

Public land that is used for tourism and recreation can not be brown. Instead of clearcutting of old forests, there is an urgent need for more recreational infrastructure in the area of Wallace Falls State Park that can relieve the overcrowded park (which brings 170.000 annual visitors), and also for support of local small rec and tourism businesses. Every single business in the Skykomish River Valley benefits directly or indirectly from tourism and recreation.

“Deal, no deal for Singletary”, article in Monroe Monitor 3-14-2017

“Agreement sets aside 25 acres from planned DNR timber auction”, article in HeraldNet 2-23-2017 and PDF 2-23-2017

Snohomish County Joint Resolution 17-006, Singletary Timber Sale 2-22-2017

Requesting that the Singletary Timber Sale be postponed while Snohomish County initiates reconveyance proceedings for a portion of the sale area.

Joint Resolution 17-006, Snohomish County Statement 2-22-2017

Snohomish County to Protect Singletary Property to Secure Vital Recreation Land.
Twenty-five acres involved in Wallace Falls compromise are included.

“Popular hiking spots face clear-cutting”, KING 5 News 2-13-2017

“Board axes 25-acre Singletary sale option near Wallace Falls State Park”, article in Monroe Monitor 2-13-2017

“State Board of Natural Resources rejects Wallace Falls timber deal”, article in HeraldNet 2-7-2017 and PDF 2-7-2017

“County supports saving timberland”, article in Monroe Monitor 2-6-2017

“Pact on timber sale could protect Wallace Falls State Park”, article in HeraldNet 2-5-2017

“Compromise preserves 25 acres at Wallace Falls from logging”, article in HeraldNet 2-2-2017  and  PDF 2-2-2017

Snohomish County Council and Executive adopted Joint Resolution 17-003: REQUESTING THAT THE WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES DEFER A PORTION OF THE SINGLETARY TIMBER SALE. Full document of the Joint Resolution 17-003, 2-1-2017

“Timber sale near Wallace Falls goes against agreement”, article in HeraldNet 1-22-2017

MAP OF TIMBER SALES NEXT TO WALLACE FALLS STATE PARK

PLANNED LOGGING NEXT TO WALLACE FALLS STATE PARK 2017-2020, part 1

PLANNED LOGGING NEXT TO WALLACE FALLS STATE PARK 2017-2020, part 2

SVENA is lobbying for expansion of  famous and popular Wallace Falls State Park (WFSP), and for conservation and restoration of area around the Park that is important for the tourism and recreation industry of Skykomish River Valley, Snohomish County and Washington State.

A large part of Morning Star NRCA includes a watershed of Spada Lake – a highly protected municipal water supply, one of the principal drinking-water sources for Snohomish County’s population, as well as a source of hydroelectric power and recreation.

More info:

spada-lake

Spada Lake, WA is a part of Morning Star NRCA (Natural Resource Conservation Area)

Morning Star Trust Land Transfer and Maps 11-2016
Bob Winslow, Trust Land Transfer Project Manager
(360) 902-1622 bob.winslow@dnr.wa.gov

Morning Star Trail Planning and Survey

Application for Morning Star Trail Planning Committee
David Way, Natural Areas Recreation Manager Northwest Region
360-333-5741 david.way@dnr.wa.gov

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SVENA COMMENTS FOR DYNO TIMBER SALE 1-2016 and DYNO FPA

SINGLETARY TIMBER SALE, LETTER OF CONCERN FROM NON-PROFITS 3-2014

DNR RESPONSE 1 TO SVENA, DYNO TIMBER SALE 1-2016 from Allen McGuire, Cascade District Manager, Northwest Region, DNR (Department of Natural Resources)

DNR RESPONSE 2 TO SVENA, DYNO TIMBER SALE 1-2016 from Rich Dodd, Rivers District Manager-Forest Practices, DNR (Department of Natural Resources)

FLUSHING FORESTS, ARTICLE AT WORLDWATCH.ORG

LANDMARK DEAL TO PROTECT CANADA GREAT BEAR RAINFOREST, BBC NEWS 2-2-2016

SVENA opposes to clearcut logging next to Wallace Falls State Park (WFSP), one of the most popular hiking destinations in Washington State. On average, it has 175 thousand visitors annually. Please read our petition at Change.org “Stop Excessive Commertial Logging in Sky Valley, WA!”.

Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) recently sold two timber sales next to WFSP despite the protests of many people and organizations to stop these timber sales or find other alternatives. Moonbeam and Singletary Timber Sales border WFSP and are a gate to more timber harvesting in the future next to the Park. Both timber sales are on the state land.

Singletary photo with a map yellow

Approximate location and extent of Singletary Timber Sale

We are working with WFLC (Washington Forest Law Center) to find ways to stop logging next to Wallace Falls State Park that will greatly impact the Park and the Valley.

Please see “Singletary Timber Sale Update” in 1-2016 Profile (publication of Pilchuck Audubon Society).

SVENA supports full funding of public education by promoting tourism and rec industry in the Valley, increasing value of real estate, and thus bringing more revenue to the State, County and school districts tax coffins.

Financial information for Singletary Timber Sale according to DNR:

$1.85 M – 2014 appraised value;
$461.8 K=25% goes to DNR;
$1.4 M=75% goes to Snohomish County;
$35.3 K = only 2.6% to Sultan School District (Local schools deserve better portion if DNR says this logging supports local kids and schools!);

100% harm to Wallace Falls State Park, recreation and tourism industry in Snohomish County, health and safety of Skykomish River Valley.

For more information, please go to End the DNR Mandate.

Daniel Chasan, J.D. “A Trust for All the People: Rethinking the Management of Washington’s State Forests”, Seattle University Law Review:

“The state does have a continuing duty to help pay school construction costs. But, even if we view that obligation as a trustee’s solemn fiduciary duty, let us remember that the granted lands are protected by two overlapping trusts. A broad public trust has always existed. Courts have ignored this trust, but they have not extinguished it. The trust is still there, and because it is, the environmental and aesthetic values of the granted lands must be safeguarded for all people, in all generations to come. The state’s obligation to the public trust beneficiaries is every bit as strong as its obligation to the public schools.”

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